Roger Federer Tennis Racquets History

Roger Federer Playing with Wilson tennis racquet in US Open wearing Maroon tennis outfit

Roger Federer, one of the legends of Tennis, has 103 ATP Singles titles in his bag, which include 20 Grand Slams, 28 ATP Masters, and a record of 6 playing 6 ATP finals.

Federer used Wilson racquets throughout most of his career, along with string savers, to make his racquets more durable and robust. He used a 90 square inch racquet head with 16 x 19 strings with a natural gut for his main lines and luxilon alu for his crosses.

In the past, he used both cross and main strings of Babolat full-gut strings mounted on a Pro Staff racquet.

Taking a look at Roger Federer Tennis Racquet History since he started in the field, and Wilson’s marketing, let’s see the different models he has used.

Roger Federer Tennis Racquets History 1998 to 2021

ModelDate
Pro Staff 85 6.0 Mid-Production Chinese1998 – 2001
Hyper Pro Staff 6.1 Silver W2002 up until the French Open
Hyper Pro Staff 6.02002
Pro Staff Tour 902003 – 2004
Wilson nSix-One Tour 902004 – 2006
Wilson K Factor Six One Tour 902007 – 2009
Wilson Six.One Tour BLX2010 – 2011
Wilson BLX Pro Staff Six.One 902012 – 2014
Wilson Pro Staff Blacked Out Prototype2013 in Hamburg and Gstaad
Wilson Prostaff RF97 Autograph2014 – 2016
Wilson Pro Staff RF97 Autograph 2017 Model2017 – 2019
Wilson Pro Staff RF97 Autograph 2018 - Tuxedo Frame2018 Grass Court Season
Wilson Pro Staff RF97 Autograph V132021 and Onwards

1. Wilson Pro Staff 85 6.0 Mid-Production Chinese

Pro Staff 85 6.0 Mid-Production Chinese

Federer used this racquet to defeat Sampras at Wimbledon back in 2001 when he burst onto the scene.

The head of this racquet is 85 square inches, which is very small by today’s standards. Many professionals will not use a racket this size; can you imagine playing clay with something this large?

During the period from 1998 to 2001, Roger competed at 10 Grand Slams with this racquet. After losing to Franco Squillari in Hamburg, he also used this racquet to cool his temper on court.

Years Used: 1998 – 2001

  • Head Size: 85 sq. in. / 548.39 sq. cm.
  • Length: 27in / 68.58cm
  • Strung Weight: 12.5oz / 354.37g
  • Balance: 10 pts HL
  • Swingweight: 321
  • Stiffness: 62
  • Beam Width: 17mm
  • Composition: 80% Braided Graphite 20% Kevlar
  • String Pattern: 16 Mains / 18 Crosses

2. Wilson Hyper Pro Staff 6.1 Silver W

Hyper Pro Staff 6.1 Silver W

When Roger started the 2002 season, this racket was his weapon of choice, although it was simply a paint job over his Pro Staff 85.

Roger has never used a head more significant than 90 square inches, which contradicts the retail specification. It’s unlikely that an 85″ may suddenly become a 95″.

Roger used this racket only once in the early days of American Hard Court in Miami and the NASDAQ-100 Open back then. After the Australian Open in 2002, he switched to a 90 square inch racket.

Years Used: 2002 up until the French Open

  • Headsize: 95 sq in / 613 sq. cm
  • Length: 27 in/ 68.6 cm
  • Unstrung: 11.7 oz / 332g
  • Strung: 12.2 oz / 347g
  • Swingweight (strung): 325
  • Beam width: 22 mm
  • Composition: Hyper Carbon / Kevlar / Graphite
  • String Pattern: 16 Mains x 18 Crosses

3. Wilson Hyper Pro Staff 6.0

Wilson Hyper Pro Staff 6.0

The French Open 2002 marked Federer’s first time using a 90 square inch frame, using the Hyper Pro Staff 6.0 Yellow W. The racquet was repainted to appear like one of the 95 square inch models, which was not the case.

Between Wimbledon 2002 and the start of the 2003 season, Roger used the Hyper Pro Staff 6.0.

Years Used: 2002

In terms of retail specifications, this model is the same as the previous one.


4. Wilson Pro Staff Tour 90

Wilson Pro Staff Tour 90

At Wimbledon, Roger Philippoussis won his first Grand Slam with this racquet in straight sets in 2003.

Until the French Open of 2004, he used it in four Grand Slam tournaments until he switched to the newly released nCode design.

 Years Used: 2003 – 2004

  • Length: 27 in/ 69 cm
  • Head Size: 90 sq in
  • Weight: 12.7 ounces / 360 grams
  • Balance Point: 12.375 in
  • Composition: 80% Graphite / 20%Kevlar
  • String Pattern: 16 Mains / 19 Crosses

5. Wilson nSix-One Tour 90

Wilson nSix-One Tour 90

Federer racquets have been painted red and white since introducing the nSix-One tour, part of the nCode line.

Between 2004 and 2006, Roger used this in a total of 11 Grand Slam events, which were some of his most successful on tour.

Years Used: 2004-2006

  • Length: 27 in / 69 cm
  • Head Size: 90 sq in
  • Weight: 12.4 ounces / 352 grams
  • Balance Point: 12.375 in
  • Construction: 17 mm Straight Beam
  • Composition 10% nCoded Hyper Carbon / 70% nCoded High Modulus Graphite / 20% Kevlar
  • String Pattern: 16 Mains / 19 Crosses

6. Wilson K Factor Six One Tour 90

Wilson K Factor Six One Tour 90

With this racquet, Roger won the French Open in 2009 and then pushed Andy Roddick to the Wimbledon final a month later.

It was a beauty to play within the strike zone, but tricky on higher balls and unforgiving due to its weight, but I bought it because I loved the design.

Year Used: 2007 – 2009

  • Length: 27 in / 69 cm
  • Head Size: 90 sq inches
  • Weight: 12.5 ounces / 354 grams
  • Balance Point: 12.375 in
  • 9pts Head Light
  • Construction: 18 mm Straight Beam
  • Composition: nCoded High Modulus Graphite / Carbon Black
  • String Pattern: 16 Mains / 19 Crosses

7. Wilson Six.One Tour BLX

Wilson Six.One Tour BLX

Despite my dislike of the design of this racquet, it performed the worst of all in terms of grand slam victories. Roger won the Australian Open with the BLX only once.

Federer had it in his hands when he lost both matches against Djokovic in New York even though he had match points in both! It was used from Australia 2010 through the 2011 US Open. That hurts!

 Years Used: 2010 – 2011

  • Length: 27 in / 69 cm
  • Head Size: 90 sq in / 581 sq cm
  • Weight: 12.5 ounces / 354 grams
  • Balance Point: 12.375 in
  • 9pts Head Light
  • Construction: 17.5mm Straight Beam
  • Composition: Karophite Black / Basalt
  • String Pattern: 16 Mains / 19 Crosses

8. Wilson BLX Pro Staff Six.One 90

Wilson BLX Pro Staff Six.One 90

A classic design that helped Roger win Wimbledon 2012 and won the Wimbledon trophy for him. I think it looks like the K Factor.

Years Used: 2012 – 2014

  • Length 27 in 69 cm
  • Head Size 90 sq in 581 sq cm
  • Weight 12.6 ounces 357 grams
  • Balance Point 12.5 in
  • 32 centimeters 8pts Head Light
  • Construction 17.5mm Straight Beam
  • Composition Karophite Black / Basalt
  • String Pattern 16 Mains / 19 Crosses

9. Wilson Pro Staff Blacked Out Prototype

Wilson Pro Staff Blacked Out Prototype

In 2013, Roger changed his racquet in response to his second-round shock loss to Staphovsky. On top of that, Roger announced that he would play with a new racquet from Hamburg and Gstaad.

A prototype model that was not widely known. Federer tested out a few different frames, including the H22, a blade 98-sized racquet.

However, a bad back resulted in him modifying to the Pro Staff 90 after suffering brutal losses on the European Clay circuit.

Years Used: 2013 in Hamburg and Gstaad


10. Wilson Pro Staff RF97 Autograph

Wilson Pro Staff RF97 Autograph

Federer changed racquets despite his return to his 90 square inch model to see out 2013.

Following some tweaking, Roger took the court with the new Wilson Prostaff RF97 Autograph in January 2014, using the prototypes he had used in the summer of 2013.

This racquet measured 97 square inches and had a string pattern of 16 x 19. Essentially, it combined the string pattern, weight, box beam design, and other aspects of Federer’s 90sq’ racquet with a larger head size to make it more forgiving.

Years Used: 2014 – 2016

  • Length: 27 in / 68.58 cm
  • Head Size: 97 sq in / 626 sq cm
  • Weight: 12.0 ounces / 340 grams
  • Balance: 30.5 cm / 12pts Head Light
  • Construction: 21.5mm Flat Beam
  • String Pattern: 16 Mains / 19 Crosses

11. Wilson Pro Staff RF97 Autograph 2017 Model

Wilson Pro Staff RF97 Autograph 2017 Model

In 2017, Wilson launched its matte black Wilson Pro Staff RF 97 Autograph. Besides its specifications, it featured a black matte finish and a slight silhouette of Federer. Federer requested a textured feel as well.

In 2017, Roger Federer won the Australian Open, the Sunshine Double, Wimbledon, Shanghai, and Basel with the racquet.

Years Used: 2017 – 2019

  • Length: 27 in / 68.58 cm
  • Head Size: 97 sq in / 626 sq cm
  • Weight: 12.0 ounces / 340 grams
  • Balance: 30.5 centimeters / 12pts Head Light
  • Construction: 21.5mm Flat Beam
  • String Pattern: 16 Mains / 19 Crosses

12. Wilson Pro Staff RF97 Autograph 2018 – Tuxedo Frame

Wilson Pro Staff RF97 Autograph 2018 Tuxedo Frame

It was introduced at the start of the 2018 grass-court season with the same specs but a fresh paint job.

Roger named the racquet the Tuxedo. However, it did not last long, as, after Wimbledon, he decided to return to the all-black frame, probably for psychological reasons.

 Years Used: 2018 Grass Court Season

  • Length: 27 in / 68.58 cm
  • Head Size: 97 sq in / 626 sq cm
  • Weight: 12.0 ounces / 340 grams
  • Balance: 30.5 centimeters / 12pts Head Light
  • Construction: 21.5mm Flat Beam
  • String Pattern: 16 Mains / 19 Crosses

13. Wilson Pro Staff RF97 Autograph V13

Wilson Pro Staff Roger Federer 97 Autograph V13

The Pro Staff RF97 V13, which comes out in 2020, uses precisely the exact specifications and composition as Federer’s since 2014. Nevertheless, the original design language of the Pro Staff from the 1980s has been reflected in this updated design.

Featuring an adjustable black base with exposed polycarbonate weave at the tip and a two-toned pinstripe along the throat, this hat offers a sleek, classy look.

 Years used: 2021 and Onwards

  • Length: 27 in / 68.58 cm
  • Head Size: 97 sqinches / 626 sq centimeters
  • Weight: 12.0 ounces / 340 grams
  • Balance: 30.5 centimeters / 12pts Head Light
  • Construction: 21.5mm Flat Beam
  • String Pattern: 16 Mains / 19 Crosses

My Observation

Roger’s racquet specifications had remained the same for several decades until he made a big change in 2013 to the current 97 square inch racquet head size.

The 90 square-inch head with a 19 x 16 string pattern remained the same, but he changed his equipment when he decided he had to compete with Djokovic and Nadal.

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